Ege, B.G.(2001); ‘‘Who is the Working Child?’’, (In: Seminar on Working Children in Turkey), DIE Publications, Ankara


Ege, B.G.(2001); ‘‘Who is the Working Child?’’, (In: Seminar on Working Children in Turkey), DIE Publications, Ankara.

Number of Works Cited: 7

Scope:

It is clear that there will be countless benefits in familiarizing with working children who get into the working life in early ages while their peers are playing games, in order to be able to find solutions for the problems of working children. From this point, the basic objective of this presentation is to offer a perspective and seek the answers to the question ‘‘who is the working child?’’ and the effort to familiarize with the working child based on the findings of a field survey (Project for Gaining Working Children to Education, Izmir 2001) conducted in Izmir within the frame of the ILO-IPEC in a program conducted together with the Ministry of Labour and Social Security.

An Excerpt from the Article:

Number of hours that children are obliged to work in a day is an important indicator of the child labour issue. Inevitably children are spending most of their times at work and less of their times for learning and leisure activities. Those struggling to achieve schooling and working together are facing numerous handicaps due to the negative effects of working over a certain threshold on the learning skills of children. (p.63)

Some Keywords:

free time, working hours, apprentice training, child workers, ILO-IPEC

 

 

Alkış, N.; İrgil, E.; Pala, K.; Aytekin, H.(2004); ‘‘Working Conditions and Social Problems of Children Studying at Gemlik Apprentice Training Center’’, Mesleki Sağlık ve Güvenlik Magazine, 17:15-20


Alkış, N.; İrgil, E.; Pala, K.; Aytekin, H.(2004); ‘‘Working Conditions and Social Problems of Children Studying at Gemlik Apprentice Training Center’’, Mesleki Sağlık ve Güvenlik Magazine, 17:15-20.

Number of Works Cited: 15

Scope:

The study has been conducted in the 2000-2001 educational year to obtain information relating to the working conditions and social problems of apprentices studying and working at Gemlik Apprentice Training Center. 89% of study participants were male, and 11% female, with a mean age of 16,9. 50,5% of apprentices stated that they attended the apprentice training center for the purpose of gaining a profession and 125 apprentices (57,3%) stated that they intended to continue with their education if a new chance could be offered. It has been found that 7,4% of apprentices worked until work completion, and 89,4% worked over 8 hours. These times are much longer than the legally required working hours. Consequently, it was found that apprentices do not practically have the rights given by laws, and worked under heavy conditions.

An Excerpt from the Article:

The apprenticeship establishment implies the children gaining professions within the workman-apprentice relationship in traditional societies and in traditional labour relationships, and familiarize with a profession group. Because apprenticeship is traditionally an establishment that the society is used to and children start working under the title of “apprentice” results in easy exploitation of child labour facing no social or cultural barriers and increase in the number of working children. (p.15)

Some Keywords:

working conditions, working hours, apprentices, alcohol and cigarette addiction in apprentices, social problem